Jul
03

5 Ways To Make Your Art Eternal In The Digital World

Gone are the days that artists risk losing their photographs, sketches, manuscripts or music by storing their creations solely on one piece of hardware (or even more dangerous: paper!). Today’s digital world gives all types of artists ways to share and save their work. Artists have several options for ensuring that their creations never disappear from the world.

1. Back Up Data on an External Hard Drive

Saving everything on a computer, a recording device or a disc means that if anything happens to that item then all its contents are gone forever. External hard drives were created not only as a means to back up data, such as word documents, pictures or music files, but also to serve as a portable storage device with potentially more memory than a laptop or desktop computer. An artist cannot put their painting or sculpture on an external hard drive, but he can save a nearly infinite number of high resolution images of his piece as well as videos of its creation.

2. Back Up Data onto a Free Online File Program

External hard drives are fairly secure because unless someone physically takes them away no one can access the information. The downside is that it must be carried around if an artist needs 24/7 access. Saving files with an online storage program gives artists the ability to view their work from any device with Internet capability. Many companies offer storage for free, according to TripWireMagazine. Free services, however, can’t be held as accountable for the security of the information stored using them.

3. Use a Paid Online File Program

Free online backup programs are great for starving artists, but if someone has the cash and a lot of work to backup, a paid program is the way to go. Paid sites and paid memberships typically offer faster upload speeds and storage space. A site designed specifically for creative types is FileCamp. It has proofing tools, flexible branding capabilities and good security. There is a free trial option but only paid memberships for online backup.

4. Set Up a Personal Cloud

Companies that give artists online storage with enough space to hold a hard drives’ worth of data can be expensive. An alternative to paying for that service that still gives people instant access online to their files, is setting up a personal cloud. By purchasing the necessary space for around $100, an artist can backup their data and access it from anywhere using any device without monthly charges, according to Time.

5. Share on Social Networks

Social networking sites such as Facebook and Google+ allow artists to upload their graphic designs, videos, photographs and links to music files. The popularity of social networking is fairly secure. Uploads to photo albums and videos never get deleted unless the creator deletes them. This gives artists the opportunity to not only ensure their work never goes away but also to allow as many people as possible to see it. Facebook has 800 million users and Google+ has 100 million and is growing, according to Mashable. All of those people become potential fans, buyers and admirers of an artist’s work once it is shared on a site.

Using an online backup system does have a few drawbacks though. It usually takes longer to upload work to a digital system or a social networking site than it does to save it to a disc. With ever increasing Internet speeds, though, new software and apps like Instagram, that time gap is closing quickly. Storing information online or in multiple places, such as an external hard drive or multiple computers, does increase the risk of theft, but people can encrypt files to protect their art.

  • http://www.gyst-ink.com/ Karen Atkinson

    These are all great suggestions. One other way to keep your archives safe is to use software to keep track of everything in your art life. Burn the whole folder to a DVD and put it in a safety deposit box once a year. Just another back up strategy, and cheap.

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