Aug
20

Emerging Leaders, Professional Jealousy and our need for Global Education, Creativity and Excellence

There is a bottomless bucket- a plethora- of books, seminars, courses, retreats, workshops and videos- about how to become a leader or improve your leadership abilities. But why is it there is little to no emphasis on how to stop, circumvent, derail and triumph over those who will do all they can to stop you from successfully becoming the leader you were meant to be?  No one ever wants to shine the light on the underbelly of a problem for too long. After all, the bright spots are far more positive and thus easier to focus on. And yet “a chain is only as strong as its weakest link”. Here lies the great weak link to developing new leadership.

I see many who in earnest have the skills, the drive, the work ethic, the intelligence, the integrity, and for ALL of the right reasons are capable of rising. And yet as they do, instead they are fired, demoted, de-friended or ignored thanks to the efforts of one very small minded, albeit powerful, fear filled individual.  After all, isn’t fear, that leads to great insecurity of one’s own lack of ability, the underlying emotion of jealousy? I have seen it countless times and experienced it myself too. Haven’t you?

This all speaks to our societal need for some debridement really.  Can we not see that this kind of behavior is synonymous with the quiet way terminates eat away at the foundation of a house? It is those small random acts, those subtly strategic comments made that can quietly begin to erode the foundation of years worth of work and investment on the part of an emerging leader. It should not take some magical potion or for the stars and moon to be aligned for a courageous individual, who works in earnest and earns the right to lead, to become a recognized leader. Nor should it take some magical potion or for the stars and moon to be aligned for jealousy to be appropriately addressed and not rewarded or be allowed to continue~ regardless of an individuals title or powerful position.

If we want our world to change we need new ways of being and doing. And this means addressing the “termites of jealousy” who are eating the foundation away of our emerging leaders for lunch because they can and because no one is stepping up to stop them.

Tips for dealing with professional jealousy:

 

 Global Education, Creativity and Excellence

The impact of a global recession on our world has dramatically increased our awareness of our need to become more globally aware in our thinking. And to prepare for this profound shift towards a stronger global economy, education has to increasingly continue to shift towards this new reality.

The Kellogg School is preparing its students for this environment through experiential classes such as Global Lab and Global Initiatives in Management (GIM), which offer practical experience for solving business problems throughout the world. Their International Business & Markets Program is encouraging professors across disciplines to infuse an international perspective in every class they teach. And this is the same approach the art and culture sector needs to take to ensure global education is part of artistic and creative development.  At the IAE our goal is to become a global educational institution and as such we are working hard to cultivate international educational relationships; our first will begin with Princess Taghrid’s Institute for Art and Handicraft Development in Amman Jordan. In 2014-15 we will roll out collaborative peer focused online interdisciplinary course work.

And the interest across higher education in advancing a global perspective is clearly on the rise.  The American Council on Education’s (ACE) ‘Mapping Internalization on US Campuses’ report indicates that the percentage of US institutions that consider international background, experience and interests when hiring faculty in fields that are not explicitly international increased by over 100% between 2006 and 2011.  The proportion of universities taking these factors into consideration increased from 32% to 68% over this period.

Increased global perspective can surely only positively contribute to the rise of creativity, innovation and excellence for cities around the world. With Chicago rolling out their cultural plan in October, I hope Chicago can use our cultural capital in new ways to lead the way in educating other cities how to become global destinations for creativity, innovation and excellence.

 

About Lisa Canning

“Vowels are to words what creativity is to the world~ pretty basic and necessary.”

Lisa Canning is the founder of IAEOU, the Institute for Arts Entrepreneurship (IAE) and Entrepreneur the Arts.

Follow me @IAEOU

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  • jerry r mitchell

    You are so very right on.

    As an entrepreneur I want to suggest one way to start our
    country on

    a positive path to more employment is through
    entrepreneur education.

    In my view, one of the most significant factors behind my
    finding is a

    lack of focus on the possibilities of being an
    entrepreneur in schools. At

    primary level, we should embed and foster the key
    elements of

    entrepreneurial behavior – curiosity, creativity,
    autonomy and initiative.

    Secondary schools should then carry through and take
    greater initiatives to

    associate students to real companies and business people
    in order to give

    them an understanding of how enterprise works in the real
    world.

    We should start embedding entrepreneurship and innovation
    in school

    subjects and teaching young people relevant skills for
    their future

    employment- not teaching them skills for jobs that are
    long gone. Whether

    you start a business or not, these skills are vital to
    the future of the

    country.

    Educational credits should be awarded for pursuing links
    with business and

    enterprise, and schools should strive to bring in
    business people to the

    school who can share their views and inspiration as well
    as mentor students

    on projects. Careers guidance should also focus more on
    the possibilities

    offered by entrepreneurship and provide opportunities for
    work experience

    within the area.

    Yes – there is still much room for improvement in terms
    of business school

    curriculums, but by engaging with students much earlier I
    think we will

    considerably enhance the chances of producing an
    outstanding crop of new

    entrepreneurs and, as every educationalist knows, the
    child is father of the

    man

    As an entrepreneur I want to suggest one way to start our
    country on

    a positive path to more employment is through
    entrepreneur education.

    In my view, one of the most significant factors behind my
    finding is a

    lack of focus on the possibilities of being an
    entrepreneur in schools. At

    primary level, we should embed and foster the key
    elements of

    entrepreneurial behavior – curiosity, creativity,
    autonomy and initiative.

    Secondary schools should then carry through and take
    greater initiatives to

    associate students to real companies and business people
    in order to give

    them an understanding of how enterprise works in the real
    world.

    We should start embedding entrepreneurship and innovation
    in school

    subjects and teaching young people relevant skills for
    their future

    employment- not teaching them skills for jobs that are
    long gone. Whether

    you start a business or not, these skills are vital to
    the future of the

    country.

    Educational credits should be awarded for pursuing links
    with business and

    enterprise, and schools should strive to bring in
    business people to the

    school who can share their views and inspiration as well
    as mentor students

    on projects. Careers guidance should also focus more on
    the possibilities

    offered by entrepreneurship and provide opportunities for
    work experience

    within the area.

    Yes – there is still much room for improvement in terms
    of business school

    curriculums, but by engaging with students much earlier I
    think we will

    considerably enhance the chances of producing an
    outstanding crop of new

    entrepreneurs and, as every educationalist knows, the
    child is father of the

    man

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